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Progressive Wage Model for the food services sector

Companies must meet the Progressive Wage Model wage and training requirements for food services workers who are Singapore citizens or permanent residents.

What is it

The Progressive Wage Model (PWM) for food services workers was developed by the Tripartite Cluster for Food Services Industry (TCF).

From 1 March 2023, employers must meet the PWM requirements in order to renew existing work passes or apply for new work passes.

Who it covers

The PWM requirements cover Singapore citizens and permanent residents who are:

  • Full-time or part-time food services employees on a contract of service, working in a premise that has a Singapore Food Agency (SFA) Food Retail or Food Processing (Central Kitchen) licence, and
  • Employed by firms which hire foreign workers on mainstream work passes (i.e. Work Permit, S Pass, Employment Pass), regardless of whether the firm is classified under the Food and Beverage Service Activities Singapore Standard Industrial Classification (SSIC) or another SSIC.

The food services PWM will cover the following food services job roles in two categories of establishments:

Category A

  • Quick-Service (QS) food establishments, including fast-food outlets, food courts, food kiosks, and eating houses where customers self-collect food or drink orders from food service counters
  • Supermarkets with ready-to-eat food stations

Category B

  • Full-Service (FS) food establishments, which are establishments that have wait staff such as waiters or banquet servers and are not under Category A
  • Caterers
  • Central kitchens
Food / drink stall assistant

Responsibilities:

  • Prepare or serve simple food / drink items from counters or steam tables in food stalls
  • Take customer orders and communicate orders to the kitchen
  • Collect payment from customers and perform cashiering duties

Examples of jobs covered:

  • Food court stall assistant
  • Coffeeshop stall assistant
Food service counter attendant

Responsibilities:

  • Prepare or serve simple food / drink items from counters or steam tables in food shops
  • Take customer orders and communicate orders to the kitchen
  • Collect payment from customers and perform cashiering duties
  • Handle commercial or industrial-grade equipment, e.g. coffee machines, deep fryer, griddles
  • Manage online orders, e.g. via digital platforms

Examples of jobs covered:

  • Fast-food service crew
  • Bubble tea shop service crew
  • Salad counter server
  • Roast grill counter attendant
Kitchen assistant (QS)

Responsibilities:

  • Handle basic food preparation
  • Prepare ingredients for cooking according to the establishment’s standard recipes and operating procedures
  • Portion, assemble or package menu dishes and other food items
  • Process new inventory items and inventory checking
  • Clean food preparation areas, kitchen stations, equipment, tables, cutlery and crockery
  • Prepare food items for ready consumption
  • Provide counter service, where needed
  • Collect payment from customers and perform other cashiering duties
  • Package food / drinks for takeaways

Examples of jobs covered:

  • Kitchen assistant
  • Kitchen crew
  • Bakery assistant
Cook (QS)

Responsibilities:

  • Supports the preparation of menu dishes
  • Assemble ingredients or kitchen equipment prior to preparation of menu dishes, according to the establishment or senior cook’s requirements
  • Apply culinary techniques to prepare food according to the establishment’s standard recipes and operating procedures
  • Supervise kitchen assistants
  • Maintain cleanliness of kitchen stations and upkeep of cooking equipment
  • Prepare batches of food that are cooked to order, or kept warm until ordered and sold

Examples of jobs covered:

  • Commis chef
  • Line cook
  • Pastry chef
  • Baker
Senior Cook (QS)

Responsibilities:

  • Direct and manage the preparation of menu dishes at one or more kitchen stations
  • Apply culinary techniques to prepare food according to the establishment’s standard recipes and operating procedures
  • Support the sous chef and head chef in the development of new menu dishes
  • May oversee one or more kitchen assistants, cooks or other kitchen staff

Examples of jobs covered:

  • Chef de Partie
  • Station chef
Kitchen assistant (FS)

Responsibilities:

  • Handle basic food preparation
  • Prepare ingredients for cooking according to the establishment’s standard recipes and operating procedures
  • Portion, assemble or package menu dishes and other food items
  • Process new inventory items and inventory checking
  • Clean food preparation areas, kitchen stations, equipment, tables, cutlery and crockery
  • Assist in cooking and plating of menu dishes according to the kitchen manual, where applicable

Examples of jobs covered:

  • Kitchen assistant
  • Kitchen crew
  • Bakery assistant
Cook (FS)

Responsibilities:

  • Supports the preparation of menu dishes
  • Assemble ingredients or kitchen equipment prior to preparation of menu dishes, according to the establishment or senior cook’s requirements
  • Apply culinary techniques to prepare food according to the establishment’s standard recipes and operating procedures
  • Supervise kitchen assistants
  • Maintain cleanliness of kitchen stations and upkeep of cooking equipment
  • Follow the senior cook’s instructions for the preparation of menu items and meeting of other operational needs
  • Support compliance with food safety and sanitation requirements, in areas such as product rotation, temperature maintenance, storage procedures, and food handling techniques

Examples of jobs covered:

  • Commis chef
  • Line cook
  • Pastry chef
  • Baker
Senior Cook

Responsibilities:

  • Direct and manage the preparation of menu dishes at one or more kitchen stations
  • Apply culinary techniques to prepare food according to the establishment’s standard recipes and operating procedures, where applicable
  • Support the sous chef and head chef in the development of new menu dishes
  • May oversee one or more kitchen assistants, cooks, or other kitchen staff

Examples of jobs covered:

  • Chef de Partie
  • Station chef
Waiter

Responsibilities:

  • Attend directly to customers’ needs and supports customer-facing operations
  • Prepare tables for service, greet walk-in customers, and escort them to their tables
  • Respond to customer enquiries and take reservations over telephone
  • Take customer orders and communicate orders to the kitchen – may be done manually
  • Serve food/drinks from kitchen to customers
  • Collect payment from customers and perform other cashiering duties

Examples of jobs covered:

  • Waiter
  • Banquet server
Waiter supervisor

Responsibilities:

  • Support the manager by overseeing customer-facing operations
  • Coordinate, manage or train waiters and other customer-facing employees
  • Supervise customer interactions and intervene where necessary
  • Ensure compliance with regulations, as well as establishment’s own service protocols and standards
  • Schedule working shifts of waiters and other customer-facing employees based on operational needs
  • Manage payroll and manpower budget for waiters and other customer-facing employees

Examples of jobs covered:

  • Waiter supervisor
Manager

Responsibilities:

  • Bear overall responsibility for the profitability of the establishment
  • Oversee all of the establishment’s operations, i.e. both customer-facing and back of house activities, e.g. kitchen, inventory management

Examples of jobs covered:

  • Restaurant manager
  • Outlet manager

Find out more on the coverage of food services job roles and description of duties and responsibilities.

Wage requirements

The food services PWM is a three to four-level career progression model, depending on career track. It features:

  • Specific training requirements that tap on the Skills Framework for Food Services. This ensures that food services workers are equipped with the skills needed to carry out their job functions.
  • Progressive wages set at each level to ensure that food services workers are paid wages that are commensurate with their skills and productivity.

The wage requirements recommended in the TCF's report will take effect from 1 March 2023.

Wage requirements for part-time workers are pro-rated on a 44-hours basis.

The TCF will undertake a review of the wage schedule in 2025.

Category AShow

Job level Monthly gross wage requirements (excluding overtime payments) for full-time food services workers (35-44 hours per week)
From 1 March 2023 From 1 March 2024 From 1 March 2025

Senior cook

Left to market forces

Up

Cook (QS)

≥ $2,000 ≥ $2,165 ≥ $2,330

Up

Kitchen assistant (QS) / Food service counter attendant

≥ $1,825 ≥ $1,990 ≥ $2,155

Up

Food / drink stall assistant

≥ $1,750 ≥ $1,915 ≥ $2,080
Job level Hourly gross wage requirements for part-time food services workers
From 1 March 2023 From 1 March 2024 From 1 March 2025

Senior cook

Left to market forces

Up

Cook (QS)

≥ $10.49 ≥ $11.35 ≥ $12.22

Up

Kitchen assistant (QS) / Food service counter attendant

≥ $9.57 ≥ $10.44 ≥ $11.30

Up

Food / drink stall assistant

≥ $9.18 ≥ $10.04 ≥ $10.91

Category BShow

Kitchen Assistant/Cook/Senior Cook

Job level Monthly gross wage requirements (excluding overtime payments) for full-time food services workers (35-44 hours per week)
From 1 March 2023 From 1 March 2024 From 1 March 2025

Senior cook

Left to market forces

Up

Cook (FS)

≥ $2,050 ≥ $2,215 ≥ $2,380

Up

Kitchen assistant (FS)

≥ $1,850 ≥ $2,015 ≥ $2,180
Job level Hourly gross wage requirements for part-time food services workers
From 1 March 2023 From 1 March 2024 From 1 March 2025

Senior cook

Left to market forces

Up

Cook (FS)

≥ $10.75 ≥ $11.62 ≥ $12.48

Up

Kitchen assistant (FS)

≥ $9.70 ≥ $10.57 ≥ $11.43

Waiter

Job level Monthly gross wage requirements (excluding overtime payments) for full-time food services workers (35-44 hours per week)
From 1 March 2023 From 1 March 2024 From 1 March 2025

Manager

Left to market forces

Up

Waiter Supervisor

≥ $2,400 ≥ $2,565 ≥ $2,730

Up

Waiter

≥ $1,850 ≥ $2,015 ≥ $2,180
Job level Hourly gross wage requirements for part-time food services workers
From 1 March 2023 From 1 March 2024 From 1 March 2025

Manager

Left to market forces

Up

Waiter Supervisor

≥ $12.59 ≥ $13.45 ≥ $14.32

Up

Waiter

≥ $9.70 ≥ $10.57 ≥ $11.43

Total monthly gross wage (for full-time work of 35-44 hours per week) refers to the sum of:

  • Basic wage
  • Allowances, e.g. travel, food, and housing
  • Productivity incentive payments

It excludes:

  • Bonuses, e.g. Annual Wage Supplement
  • Stock options
  • Reimbursement of special expenses incurred in the course of employment
  • Payments-in-kind
  • Employer CPF contributions

Additional PWM gross wage requirements for overtime

For full-time workers who work more than 44 hours a week and are covered by the Employment Act's Part 4, employers would need to adhere to additional PWM gross wage requirements for overtime.

In addition to meeting the PWM requirements for overtime, employers would need to adhere to the Employment Act’s Part 4 requirements for overtime, where the overtime rate of pay must be at least 1.5 times of the basic rate of pay.

Training requirements

Employers must ensure that their Singapore citizen and PR food services workers meet the food services PWM training requirements of attaining at least 2 Workforce Skills Qualification (WSQ) Statement of Attainment, out of the list of approved WSQ training modules.

Alternatively, if employers have in-house WSQ training modules that have the prefix “FSS” in the accompanying Technical Skills & Competencies (TSC) code, these training modules can be used to meet the training requirements as well.

For the job roles of senior cook and manager, training as per the list of approved WSQ training modules is encouraged but not mandatory. Employers have the flexibility to train employees in senior positions according to their own business needs.

Employers will be given a grace period to comply with the food services PWM training requirements:

  • For new hires: six months from the new hire’s date of employment
  • For existing employees: up till 29 February 2024 (one year from the food services PWM implementation on 1 March 2023)

Through proper training, food services workers will be able to increase their productivity, skillsets, and offer good food service experiences to customers.

For more detail on the training requirements and the list of approved WSQ training modules, please see Annex C of the TCF report.

Phased implementation of food services PWM

From the first six months from March 2023 to August 2023, MOM will give employers time to adjust and comply with the food services wage requirements.

Instead of enforcement, MOM will focus on educating employers on the food services PWM wage requirements. Those who do not comply with the requirements during this transitional period will not have their work pass privileges suspended.

Find out more

For more information: